Impostor syndrome in the Boardroom

  1. Be prepared. Meaning, understand you are a board member before you actually take a seat at the table. Of course, studying about the company is crucial, but I am also talking about engaging with other board members and asking about their experience and their strategic views on the company before that first meeting.
  2. Create a connection. I find that when there is a connection among board members, enabled by trust, the discussions are often more honest, open, and fruitful. Taking feedback from one another becomes business as usual and there are no hidden agendas when asking the tough questions.
  3. Ask for help. An environment like the one described above is an invitation to ask for help when needed. I came to realize that asking questions is not a sign of weakness, but rather a superpower. Asking for help can save you many shoulds, can help you calm that voice that wants to label you an impostor, and can free up space in your mind to operate in a sharper way.

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WeInvest is a community of women investing in Latin America across Venture Capital, Private Equity, Family Offices, Accelerators, and Angel Investments.